Albondigas Soup

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Soup soup soup! I love you so! Let me count the ways! Soup is such a yummy, nourishing, and healthy staple in almost every culture. It makes the most of bones and helps to tenderize cheaper cuts of tougher meats. Lately I’ve been making a lot of Asian soups, which prompted a need for change. I haven’t experimented with too many kinds of soups outside of my Asian comfort zone, but I do remember that I enjoyed some delicious Mexican stews when I was growing up in a little city called El Monte. With a predominantly Chicano population, El Monte boasts some tasty Mexican food. I fell in love with Mexican food when I was a kid, craving tacos constantly only to be told by my family “It will make you fat! Eat rice instead!” Oh the irony….

As I no longer live in an area that is blessed with plentiful options for authentic Mexican food beyond tacos, I’ve been playing with recipes to create one of my favorite Mexican stews. I tried it both with and without tomato, and I found that it was much tastier with the acidic brightness that tomato adds. I have also played around with different types of broth bases. But essentially, I think any fresh meat and/or bones that you have lying around are going to make the best possible broth rather than just relying on store-bought chicken broth. I am trying to eat healthier to propel me toward my personal fitness goals, so this recipe fits the bill. It has loads of veggies, some nice lean(ish) protein, and fills you up with a delicious yet light broth. But a friendly disclaimer: I have no idea if this recipe is authentic or not. I am just trying to recreate the albondigas I had from delicious Mexican restaurants when I was younger. I will not claim that this is an authentic version of albondigas, but it is tasty, filling, and healthy. Hope you give it a try and that it helps you toward your health goals!

 

Cooking notes/tips:

When making any bone/meat based broth, always scoop out the brownish foam from the top. That is a result of the blood and any impurities from the meat being released. They have a grimy texture and unpleasant flavor, so always discard. I watch Maangchi, a super popular YouTube food blogger who specializes in Korean cooking. She taught me to soak your meat in cold water for a while before using in broth. Another method is the parboiling method, which is often used in Chinese and Vietnamese soups. To parboil, simply bring a big pot of water to boil, place your bones in, and allow to cook on medium high heat for 5-10 minutes until you see most of the impurities (i.e. foam) form at the top. Then remove pot from heat and discard all the water from your pot, rinse your bones clean, and then start again with a fresh pot of water. This time, once it reaches a boil, lower your heat to a simmer. This will ensure pure and clean broth almost every time.

For my dog owners out there, soups and stews are a great way to make use of the water that is used to boil your dog’s meats for the week. Another reason why I love soup is because I have a dog who loves chicken, pork, and beef meats. Since dogs need to have their meats boiled, I usually use the water from boiling my dog’s meats as a broth base for soup or stew dishes I am working on for the week.

Recipe
Serves: 8
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes

Broth
1 lb chicken thighs
½ gallon water
3 Mexican squash, diced 1-inch cubes
4 stalks celery, chopped
½ onion, chopped
2 carrots, chopped
½ can crushed tomatoes
2 bay leaves
1 tbsp garlic salt
1 tbsp seasoned salt, to taste
1 tbsp dried oregano
1 bunch cilantro, chopped

Albondigas
1 lb ground beef
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 minced shallot
1 tsp garlic salt, to taste
1 tsp seasoned salt (e.g., Trader Joe’s), to taste
1 tsp ground cumin
1 pinch red pepper flake
1 pinch of black pepper
1/2 bunch green onion, finely chopped
1 egg
Optional: 1 tsp smoked chipotle powder
Optional: serve with lime juice

 

Directions

Heat a large pot with water. Place chicken thighs inside water and boil until you see a brownish foam ~7-10 minutes. Discard foam from the top. Add in carrots once water begins to boil and turn fire to medium low.

While waiting for water to boil, prepare meatballs. Place ground beef, shallots, garlic, garlic salt, seasoned salt, cumin, red pepper flake, pepper, green onion, and egg into a large mixing bowl. Use hands to mix together all ingredients for meatballs. Knead meatballs for 5 minutes, lifting the mixture and using force to toss it back into the mixing bowl. Repeat at least 5 times until mixture begins to stick together. Set aside.

Check broth. Remove chicken thighs from stew and set aside for later use. Once carrots have softened, add in celery, onion, Mexican squash, and crushed tomatoes. Add in seasonings as well: bay leaves, garlic salt, seasoned salt, and oregano.

Begin forming meat mixture into meatballs 1-2 inches in diameter. After all meatballs have been formed, drop meatballs into the soup and allow to cook until their color turns from pink to light brown ~10-15 minutes.

Once meatballs are cooked through and vegetables are tender, taste for seasoning and add salt, seasoned salt, pepper, and/or garlic salt to taste.

Spoon into individual bowls and garnish with chopped cilantro and a squeeze of lime juice if desired.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “Albondigas Soup

  1. mistimaan May 27, 2018 / 11:03 pm

    Nice recipe

    Like

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