Soy Sauce Glazed Steak

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It is with a heavy heart that I write this post. I have been avoiding writing on the food blog, because it is tied to my Instagram account, which was named in honor of my beloved fur baby, Benji. Sadly, we had to put our little doggy to rest on June 14. This was one of the most difficult decisions that my husband and I have had to make. We went through various stages of grief, guilt, and shame. Now, I feel that we are at a place of acceptance and peace, or at least working toward it. As a therapist, I try to emphasize healthy coping strategies to my patients. I am trying to practice what I preach. We have made a memorial collage in Benji’s honor and are working on cartoon caricature stickers and t-shirts at the moment. We want to celebrate the life that he lived and focus on our happy uplifting moments, rather than the difficulty of the last days of his life. In that spirit, I thought I might post a recipe that Benji might have enjoyed and eat his favorite foods in his honor. His favorite foods in the world were: steak (or beef), chicken, Japanese sweet potato, and fried eggs. He absolutely loved steak and enjoyed it every Christmas and Thanksgiving when my family would make loads of it. He would pace around the kitchen near my feet every time I seared a nice juicy steak. This was so endearing that it would often earn him a nice nibble as a treat. Which is why Ray and I decided to prepare a big juicy rib eye steak for Benji as his last meal on the last day we had with him. Every time I smell beef or prepare it for dinner, I will always think of my precious little guy and what joy he experienced as he relished this special treat. RIP my little pup.

I hope that you enjoy this recipe for an Asian-inspired soy sauce glazed steak with green onions. I actually prepared this recipe using some rib eye that I had dry aged in my own refrigerator for 20 days. This aging process intensified the beefiness of the meat and made it super tender. If you have the time and patience and can stomach wasting about 20% of your roast, I would highly recommend dry aging at home.

Steps for Simple Dry Aging at Home:

  1. Rinse your roast and pat dry with clean paper towels.
  2. Cover your meat completely with a large piece of cheesecloth, wrapping 3-4 layers around the meat. This will helps to absorb any moisture that is released during the dry aging process.
  3. Elevate meat onto a rack and place onto a plate.
  4. Place in your refrigerator and let sit for ~20 days.
  5. After 20 days, unwrap the meat from the cheesecloth and cut off dried/leathery surfaces.
  6. Take the meat that is left and prepare as steaks or stir-fries.

 

Cooking Tips:

Ingredients in stir fries involving veggies and proteins are often cooked in separate batches. Because you have various cooking times of your ingredients you want to be strategic so as not to overcook your veggies. In general: cook your meat first, and then remove from the wok/heat. This prevents your meat from overcooking. Then cook your veggies starting from the thickest/ones that will take the longest to cook.

Flavor each component of your stir-fry separately first, and then together. For example, add seasoning to your meat and allow to sit for a few minutes. Afterward, add seasoning to your veggies as they cook separately. When you mix the meat back in to the veggies to cook, season again, usually with some kind of sauce (e.g., soy sauce, oyster sauce, fish sauce, black bean sauce).

Some folks parboil thicker veggies ahead of time to reduce stir-fry time. For example, broccoli, green beans, cauliflower, etc… By parboiling, I mean that you should cook them only for 2-5 minutes so that the veggies are still crunchy and not cooked through yet. You want the stir-fry process to finish the cooking. Otherwise, you will end up with mushy vegetables.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 5-7 minutes

Ingredients
1 lb steak, cut into ½ inch thick strips
1 tsp salt
black pepper to taste
1 tbsp oil
1 bunch of green onion, cut into 2-inch pieces
1 tbsp soy sauce
1 tsp sugar
1 tbsp butter

Season beef with salt and pepper. Set aside.

Prepare green onion and cut into 2-inch pieces.

Turn on wok or skillet on high. When pan is very hot, add oil. When oil is shimmery, add steak and allow to sear for 30 seconds-1 minute on each side until beef is just cooked through. Then remove beef from skillet

Add green onion and sauté for 1-2 minutes

Add beef back into pan with green onion. Add butter. Stir-fry and add soy sauce, sugar, and black pepper to taste.

Taste and adjust for seasoning.

Remove from heat and serve.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Tomato Beef Stir Fry

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Continuing on my lower carb eating goals, I have been trying out various stir-fries. Although I have to admit that I dearly miss white rice, I am also satisfied by the richness of flavors imbued in stir-fried dishes. Because of the practice of cooking meat and veggies on very high heat, stir-fries often carry a rich smokiness that comes from a hot wok (referred to as “wok air” in Cantonese). This is analogous to the smoky quality of American barbecue, as it differentiates truly great stir-fry from mediocre stir fry.

Traditional stir-fries in Chinese cuisine require copious amounts of oil, a practice that I try to modify in my own home cooking. I remember feeling appalled when I saw my parents cook a stir-fried vegetable dish at home. You would never think that almost half a cup of oil went into the healthy-looking vegetable dish served on our dinner table. Of course, I appreciate that the oil provides a certain level of flavor and texture in Chinese cuisine, so I do not believe in stir frying completely without oil. But I have found my own ways of achieving a similar flavor profile while saving on calories and fat.

Your basic stir-fry is comprised of the following:

  1. Oil
  2. Aromatics (garlic, ginger, scallion, chile)
  3. Thinly sliced vegetables
  4. Thinly sliced meat
  5. Flavoring sauce (salt, soy sauce, oyster sauce, fish sauce, shrimp paste, black bean sauce, etc…)

Once you have this formula down, you can be creative and make new combinations of stir-fries. In stir-fries, it is absolutely essential that you first start by frying your aromatics in oil. This perfumes and flavors your oil so that the veggies and meat that are eventually cooked in it will also take on the flavor profile of the aromatics. But be careful not to burn your aromatics, especially garlic. Once your garlic turns somewhat golden brown, dump all your vegetables in and stir vigorously. This will release much-needed liquid to prevent your garlic from burning. Another trick is to splash a bit of water into your wok/pan and then cover with a lid to create some steam for more rapid cooking.

Also, I know I often rant about how adding sesame oil to a dish does not necessarily make it an authentic Asian dish. I get upset when I think about some famous chefs and their take on Asian food because it always involves sesame oil. And that is just not the case. Clearly, some dishes greatly benefit from the rich earthiness of sesame oil, but there are also times that it does not belong. This is actually a dish that benefits from such a splash of sesame oil. So, drizzle away! But not too much. Too much of sesame oil will make your dish taste like dirt. Yuck.

Cooking notes/tips:

An essential nuance in cooking with a wok is timing and knowing which ingredients to stir fry first, which to stir-fry together, and which must be separately stir-fried and then combined later on with the sauce. Most stir fried veggie dishes start off with the browning of garlic in oil before adding the other ingredients. The problem is that the garlic will quickly burn if it is not given some liquid. To prevent burning of garlic, I usually add a splash of water to my stir-fry after adding the vegetables. Traditional Chinese cooking utilizes LOADS of oil to prevent garlic from burning, but that is a rather unhealthy approach, so I prefer my splash of water.

In stir-fries involving meat and veggies, I almost always stir-fry the meat first, remove it from the pan, and then stir fry the veggies separately. This allows proper cooking of each ingredient, as cooking them all at once will create a watery mess. They are later combined and stir-fried with the sauce, which is oftentimes soy sauce, fish sauce, oyster sauce, fermented bean sauce.

Stir-fried vegetables should always retain some level of crunch after cooking. When in doubt, slightly undercook your veggies. That way, the residual heat will do the rest of the softening of the veggies. For people who follow a meal prep life, undercooking the veggies is a good strategy to give your veggies the perfect texture after re-heating.

 

Ingredients

1 tbsp oil
½ lb Flank steak, cut into thin strips
1 tbsp soy sauce
1 tsp corn starch
1 tbsp oil
1 bunch of garlic chive, cut into 2-inch pieces
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes cut into 1-inch wedges
2 tbsp oyster sauce
1 tsp sugar
Optional: splash of sesame oil

Marinate steak in soy sauce and corn starch. Allow to sit at least 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, prep other ingredients.

Turn on wok or skillet on high. When pan is very hot, add oil. When oil is shimmery, add flank steak and stir fry for 3-5 minutes until beef is just cooked through. Then remove from heat.

Add oil to the skillet/wok, and when oil is shimmery, add in garlic chives and tomato. Stir fry for 3-5 minutes, until vegetables are slightly softened.

Add in beef and stir fry together. Add in oyster sauce and sugar. Stir fry another minute. Taste for seasoning.

Remove from heat and serve.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Beef Bourguinon With Cheesy Mashed Potatoes

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Julia Child was a pioneer in making French food accessible to Americans. I fondly remember watching her show on PBS as a kid. To be honest, I was too young to appreciate her talents at that age. But now, I am so thankful that she stuck to her guns and kept forging ahead with her cooking. Watching “Julie and Julia” made me really curious about this special dish called beef bourguinon. I wondered what the big fuss was all about. From all the different steps to preparing the ingredients to the long slow cooking process in a fancy Dutch oven that costs almost as much as my part of the rent.

My version does not use a Le Creuset Dutch oven, but I doubt that it made a huge impact on the flavor since I pulled out all the stops to develop flavor in the broth. The key to creating depth of flavor lies in all the browning, sautéing, and deglazing processes. So if you take the time with those steps, you should be good to go, fancy equipment or not. =)

With the busy holidays coming up, I’m not sure how many posts I’ll be able to make. So I will make this my main holiday dish post. Beef bourguinon is supposed to be a dish for special guests and special occasions. All the time and effort that go into the stew can be tasted with every morsel. I remember making this for my husband’s office a few weeks ago. They are a small company with close ties, and there was news of the sudden passing of one of his coworkers. Everyone was blind sighted by this, and struggled with get through the week. It also happened to be my husband’s birthday a few days later. In hopes of cheering folks up or at least providing some comfort, I made this stew for his office-mates. After all, what is more comforting than stew? I am really glad that I can offer comfort to those that I care about through my cooking.

I hope that this recipe is helpful to you when you are looking for that special dish that will uplift spirits and warm the soul. Happy Holidays everyone.

 

Cooking notes/tips:

When working with a slow-cooker, always be careful in the timing of your cooking and be sure to place ingredients in at different times because if you put meat and veggies in at the beginning of a stew, the veggies will all disintegrate by the end of cooking. It is easy to overcook dishes when using a slow-cooker, which will result in dry meat paste. So for this dish, make sure you turn off the slow-cooker once your meat is just falling apart with the touch of a fork.

Make sure you sauté your mushrooms separately and then add them into your stew only at the very end of cooking. Otherwise, your mushrooms will disintegrate into the stew.

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I’ve made this stew and served it with cheesy polenta/grits, which works equally as well as mashed potatoes. It’s a matter of personal preference. You can also just eat it with a nice loaf of crusty fresh bread.

Choose a red wine that you enjoy drinking rather than relying on “cooking wines.” I personally do not drink alcohol very often, so I usually just find a relatively cheap bottle of Pinot Noir in the $10 range.

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 5 hours

Beef Bourguinon
5 lbs beef stew meat, cubed
1 tsp salt
1 tsp pepper
2 tbsp olive oil
5 large carrots
1 cup pearl onions
1 small can tomato paste
1 tsp salt, or to taste
1 tsp pepper, or to taste
1 cup dry red wine (Pinot Noir)
1 quart beef stock
1 quart water
4 stalks of fresh thyme
3 bay leaves
2 tbsp butter

1 cup baby portabello mushrooms, quartered
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 tbsp corn starch
4 tbsp water
1 spring of fresh thyme, stems removed

Cut beef into 2-inch cubes and season with salt, and pepper. Allow the meat to sit for 10 minutes.

In a heated oiled skillet, brown the beef. Add red wine and tomato paste. Cook for 5 minutes. Season with more salt and pepper.

Place beef mixture into crockpot/slow cooker and add in beef stock, water, fresh springs of thyme, and bay leaves. Slow cook on high setting for 4 hours.

With one hour left of cooking, add in carrots and pearl onions. Allow too cook for 1 more hour or until beef is tender.

Meanwhile, heat a skillet on medium high heat and add in butter and olive oil. Add in mushrooms and allow to brown, with minimal turning. When mushrooms are beginning to brown, add in minced garlic and fresh thyme. Sauté for 1 more minute and season with salt and pepper. Set aside.

When beef is tender, taste broth and beef for seasoning. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Mix corn starch with cold water until corn starch is dissolved. Then add this to your stew to allow it to thicken ~5 minutes.

When stew is thickened, add in sautéed mushrooms and serve with mashed potatoes (recipe below)

Cheesy Mashed Potatoes
2 lbs potatoes, cut and peeled
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup whole milk
6 tbsp butter
½ cup grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese
~ 1 tbsp garlic salt or sea salt

Boil 2 quarts of water. Place cut and peeled potatoes into boiling water. Boil until potatoes can be easily pierced by a fork ~20 minutes.

Heat heavy cream, milk, and butter in a sauce pan. Add in salt and mix well.

Drain potatoes and mash with a potato masher. When potatoes are mashed, add in cream mixture. Mix well into potatoes.

To create a smoother creamier texture, use handheld immersion blender to whip potatoes. Add in Parmigiano cheese and season with salt and pepper to taste.

 

Enjoy!

Easiest, Crispiest, Broiled Chicken Drumsticks

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Turkey day is almost upon us. The holidays are a time to feel gratitude for our friends and family. One person I am thankful for is my uncle. He is an amazing cook and loving father. I really don’t know where I would be without his love, support, and guidance. He taught me to ride a bike, rollerblade, and to work my butt off to achieve my goals. He used to test me on my multiplication tables and catch me at slacking and over-promising which ones I would have memorized. As I kid, I thought I could get away with anything as long as I put a cute smile on my face. My uncle did not fall for this trick, which taught me that I needed to just buckle down and put in the elbow grease to accomplish things. These lessons were so influential in molding who I am as a person.

My uncle was not only influential in helping me build my work ethic, but also my cooking. To be honest, I have never been a big fan of turkey. My family instead prefers chicken, pork, or beef. Instead of having turkey for Thanksgiving, my uncle would often make these chicken drumsticks in bulk for the family. I can still smell the rich, garlicky, scent of the chicken as he took it out of the oven. It was still sizzling in its own fat and juices by the time it reached the table. These are the crispiest, yummiest, caramelized broiled chicken pieces of magical goodness you will have. And they are super easy and quick to make. They are no fuss and foolproof if you follow the cooking directions. The trick is in letting your chicken marinade in garlic salt overnight. It is also important to drain your chicken of juices 3-4 times during the cooking process. Seems sacrilegious, but trust me on this. It will be the most amazing crispy chicken ever. And you don’t even have to fry it!

Cooking tips:

Always pat your meat dry before broiling or searing to create a beautiful golden brown color. I do this with tofu, chicken, steaks, salmon, and scallops before pan-frying. Basically, water is the enemy of crispiness and browning. In this chicken drumstick recipe, the same is true. Pat your chicken dry before broiling.

For this chicken recipe, you’ll want to rub your chicken skin with oil before broiling to help the skin to become crispy.

Allow your chicken to marinade overnight for best results. If not, then marinade for at least 4 hours.

Every oven has its hotspots and cooler spots. To get perfectly evenly cooked chicken, you’re going to have to rotate your chicken from the hotspot to the cool spot and vice versa.

Retain chicken juices to make a pan sauce if desired. You can easily do this by adding some garlic, shallot, butter, and sautéing them until softened. Then add white wine and chicken pan juices and you’ve got a delicious pan sauce. Season with salt and pepper to taste. You can even add a splash of lemon juice for some extra brightness!

 

Serves 2-3
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cooking Time: 25-30 minutes

5 chicken drumsticks
1 tbsp garlic salt
1 tbsp olive oil
pepper, to taste

 

Season chicken with garlic salt and rub into meat. Allow to sit in refrigerator overnight.

Take chicken out of marinade and pat dry with paper towels until completely dry.

Pre-heat oven to broil setting.

Line a baking sheet with foil. Place olive oil onto baking sheet and rub drumsticks in oil until every surface is covered in oil. Leave skin side up on drumsticks.

Place drumsticks into the oven ~6 inches below the broiler. Any closer and your chicken skin will burn before the inside is cooked.

5-10 minutes into cooking, drain juices and flip chicken. Allow to cook for another 5 minutes or until the chicken is somewhat browned, then flip and drain juices again. Rotate chicken as needed depending on hotspots and coolspots in oven. Repeat this process of draining and rotating chicken every 5 minutes until chicken is completely cooked through and skin is crispy.

Remove from oven to cool and sprinkle with black pepper.
Enjoy!