Shrimp Ceviche/Black Bean Salsa

IMG_7754Growing up in a primarily Mexican-American neighborhood, I had easy access to authentic Mexican food-moist tamales, mouthwatering sopes, satisfying but simple tacos, and oh my goodness, the ceviche! I realize that authentic ceviche involves cooking raw seafood in citrus (usually lemon or lime juice) for many hours. However, I had to cater my ceviche to an Asian audience-namely, my family members. The Chinese palate leaves little room for raw anything, much less raw meat. Coming from a time and place when cleanliness concerns and food-borne infections could mean life or death, I understand my parents’ and grandparents’ concern when I told them how I had made my first batch of ceviche. So, I have modified my shrimp ceviche recipe to minimize the possibility of GI issues from having consumed undercooked meat. I realize that pre-boiling shrimp is not the authentic approach to making ceviche, but it is what gives my loved ones and me peace of mind when we plunge our tostadas into the juicy satisfying coolness of a fresh batch of ceviche.

For those who do not eat seafood, I have also made a black bean version of this dish, which has also been a crowd pleaser. In fact, that is one of the reasons that I created this food blog. After bringing the black bean salsa, I had several people ask me for the recipe, which prompted the thought: Wouldn’t it be nice if I actually had recipes in print that I can refer people to when they want to know how I made something? Now here we are. I finally have a place to direct people to for my recipes. I’m not trying to get instafamous or youtube famous (although that would be so lovely). I just want to share my food, cooking, and thoughts about food with others.

Anyway, coming back from that personal aside, shrimp can get expensive, so substituting black bean for the seafood makes this a great dish for potlucks, entertaining, or good healthy plant-based eating. The base of both these dishes is the same- a solid pico de gallo, comprised of tomato, onion, cilantro, chili pepper, and lemon/lime juice. So once you master the perfect umami balance that characterizes pico de gallo, you can use this as a base with a wide range of ingredients to create equally tantalizing concoctions.

Cooking tips:

Always keep in mind the chip you are serving with any salsa. If you have a very salty chip, go easy on the salt with your salsa. Mexican food is all about that perfect umami balance of salt, sour and spicy.

I made my own tostadas because they are healthier than the deep-fried kind. With tostadas, I’ve learned one thing: they are extremists when it comes to oil. Either use a lot of oil to fry them or don’t use any at all. Anything in between these extremes and you’ll get a soggy chewy mess. I opt for the no oil option for health reasons. And honestly, I don’t even really notice the difference between fried and baked tostada when you’ve got a delicious nest of ceviche or black bean salsa resting on it.

For any chunky salsa recipe, including pico de gallo, that I make, I always squeeze the chopped up ingredients with my hands. In my not-so-scientific opinion, it releases the juices from the respective veggies, allows them to swim with the juices of others, and then absorb the flavors of all the other kids in the pool. Try it out and see if you notice a difference!

Recipe
Serves 6
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Marinade time: 3 hours-overnight

Ceviche/Black Bean Salsa
1 lb shrimp or 1 can black beans
2 ears fresh corn or 2 cups of frozen corn (only add if making black bean salsa)
5 large roma or any juicy ripe tomato
1 bunch of cilantro
1/2 onion, chopped
6 small avocados
3-5 pickled Serrano chiles
optional: 1-2 fresh jalapenos or Serrano chiles
a few generous pinches of salt, to taste
juice of 1 lemon and 2 limes

Tostadas
Corn tortillas

Directions
Peel and devein shrimp. Drop into boiling water and allow to boil for 3-5 minutes until just cooked through. Rinse with cold water to stop the cooking process and chop into bite sized pieces. (or Rinse black beans and allow to drain for 1-2 minutes.)

Finely dice tomatoes, onion, chiles, and cilantro and mix together. Add lemon juice and salt. When juicing lemon try to get some of the oils from the skin out-it intensifies the lemon flavor.

(Add in corn if you are making the black bean salsa.)

Wear plastic cooking gloves. Using your hands, squeeze the juices of the mixed chopped vegetables and continue to mix for approximately 2-3 minutes. This allows the flavors of the salsa ingredients to combine. Add in shrimp and continue squeezing and combining. (If you are making the black bean salsa, simply incorporate black beans to the salsa and let sit. Do not squeeze into the pico de gallo mix as that will smash the beans.)

Let it sit for at least 3 hours. For best results, let sit overnight.

For tostadas, pre-heat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and place tortillas in a single layer onto a baking sheet. Allow to bake 15-20 minutes, rotating at least once to prevent burning. Take tostadas out when they are golden brown.

Serve with fresh avocado. Do not pre-mix avocado into the salsa as it will brown.

 

 

Cajun Shrimp & Grits

IMG_7847

I’ve recently noticed that the progression of life-relationships, career goals, family obligations, personal goals-leads to more and more tasks that occupy my time and energy. Playing back the video of my life, I’ve allowed my professional goals to call the shots throughout most of my early years. Granted, this choice was out of necessity as I was striving for self-improvement. But, as I reflect on how my life has been up until this point, I realize that I do not wish to be remembered only as a “good worker.” I want to live my life fully and spend my time engaging in activities that bring me joy, not just money and more lines on my resume. In my clinical work with older adults, I have learned invaluable lessons that many of us do not realize until we experience life-and-death situations or “wake-up calls.” These patients have taught me that later on when I reflect on how I’ve lived my life, I will never wish that I had worked more or that I had gotten better grades or purchased another car or house. Ironically, that is how many of us live our lives. My life has focused on getting the grade, adding another spot on my resume, getting the job, and reaching financial security. Most people expect mental health workers to have it all figured out and to have life perfectly in balance. The reality is that we are all struggling with figuring out our values and living a life that is consistent with those values. Knowing what I know about what brings people true happiness, I still get caught in the capitalist narrative like a hamster spinning on a wheel. Sometimes I’m not sure how to get off. That may be why I chose to start this food blog in the first place. It was finally a project for which I did not expect a grade or some kind of monetary or tangible return. It was something that I did for me. It is my way of expressing and sharing my love of the magic that can happen in the kitchen when you have a creative mind and inquisitive palate. Even now, I struggle to find time to post on this blog, but I am trying to make a commitment to be more consistent. So here is something that I made for a sunset picnic with my partner today. He and I have not had much time to ourselves lately, and I wanted to make our picnic extra special. So, my mind automatically went to comfort food.

Without further ado, here is my recipe for Cajun shrimp and grits. I remember eating delicious vibrant foods when I visited New Orleans. The loud, bombastic flavors tantalized my taste buds and left me satisfied and happy. I believe that THAT is the essence of comfort food. I wish I could make another trip to New Orleans or the South for some real southern food. Short of that, I opted to bring the South to me. Hope you enjoy this recipe for a Sunday brunch or decadent dinner.

Cooking tips:

Overcooking shrimp is a common kitchen mistake. It leaves the shrimp with a dry rubbery texture. For this dish, you only need to sear both sides quickly and then finish off the cooking in the sauce. That way the shrimp will not overcook.

When sautéing in butter, always add a splash of olive oil or other oil with a higher burning point. Butter burns at lower temperatures, which makes it unsuitable for sautéing or frying on its own.

Leek, garlic, and shallot are seafood’s friends! I use these aromatic veggies in almost all the Italian and Cajun seafood dishes that I make because its pairing takes away from the stench that seafood can exhibit.

As a shortcut for the grits, I bought pre-made polenta. Otherwise, cooking grits from scratch can take 45 mins to an hour. If you have the time, be my guest. =) But time-savers are always welcome in my kitchen.

 

Recipe

Serves 2
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes

½ lb Shrimp
Cajun rub (below)
½ lb shrimp
1 tbsp butter
1 tbsp olive oil
1 tsp red pepper flake
½ cup thinly sliced leek
1 thinly sliced shallot
¼ red bell pepper, diced
¼ green bell pepper, diced
¼ onion, diced
1 bunch scallion, sliced
½ head garlic, minced
1 tsp flour
1 tbsp water

Cajun Rub
¼ c brown sugar
2 tbsp barbecue rub (½ tbsp cayenne pepper, ½ tbsp black pepper, 1 tsp salt, ½ tbsp garlic powder)
½ tbsp chipotle powder
½ tbsp garlic salt

Grits
1 cup pre-cooked polenta
2 cups low sodium chicken broth
½ cup heavy whipping cream
1 tbsp butter
½ cup grated white cheddar
salt to taste

Directions:

Grits
Heat chicken broth and polenta in a pot. Bring to a boil and then lower fire to low heat. Cook for 15 minutes until polenta has softened.

Then add cream and grated cheese. Mix well into grits. Use a handheld immersion blender to work out any clumps and ensure that the grits are smooth.

Continue cooking until the grits have thickened and the excess liquid has evaporated. The desired texture should be that of runny mashed potatoes. When your grits have reached this stage, check for seasonings and add salt to taste.

Shrimp
Devein, clean, and pat dry shrimp. Then mix with Cajun rub and set aside.

Heat a large skillet on high heat. Add in butter and oil. Then add aromatic vegetables: leek, shallot, garlic, red and green peppers, and onion. Add red pepper flake. Sauté and sweat until the vegetables have just softened. Remove from pan.

Add more butter and oil to the pan to sear shrimp. Sear shrimp until both sides are just golden brown and the inside is still uncooked. Add in sautéed aromatic vegetables and cook together for 1-2 minutes.

Then add ½ cup of water to deglaze the pan. Allow to cook for 2-3 minutes until the sauce reduces. Then mix flour with 1 tbsp water and work out any clumps. Add this mixture to the shrimp and cook until slightly thickened –another 1-2 minutes. Check for seasoning and add salt, pepper, and/or red pepper flake as needed.

Take off of heat and serve on top of grits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creamy Pasta with Chicken, Tomato, and Spinach

IMG_7727For the majority of my meals, I am watching my refined carbohydrates and trying to reduce starches in my diet. I have come a long way in the realm of healthy eating and weight management-an achievement of which I am incredibly proud. But, every once in a while, I completely give in to my love of pasta. Soaking in tomato sauce, kissed by basil, swimming in broth, how I love pasta. Let me count the ways. I can’t help it-I just love food in all shapes and forms. And pasta, whether dressed up in a bow tie, slenderized in fettuccine, or rolled thinly and svelte as papperdelle, never disappoints. And the cherry on top? The delicious sauce that comes as its partner! Whenever I eat pasta at restaurants, I always indulge in a nice creamy sauce because I usually limit myself to tomato-based sauces when I cook at home. However, some foods are made to nourish the body and some have been designed to nourish the soul.

Today, I was inspired to make this dish because I needed to nourish the body and soul of my brother-in-law. My sister recently gave birth to her first child- my niece Jamie. I am so thrilled to finally be an auntie! She is absolutely adorable and I can’t wait to see what kind of person she becomes. We all know it takes a village to raise a child. So I’ve begun delivering meals for my brother-in-law because my sister has been occupied with caring for her new bundle of joy. I asked myself: what would I want to eat if I were completely exhausted an in need of a pick-me-up? Pasta was the first thing that came to mind.

IMG_7720

Cooking Tips

When cooking pieces of chicken breast in a sauce, it is important to be strategic about how big the chicken breast pieces will be. Cut them too small and the chicken will become dry after cooking for a short amount of time. If they are too large and thick, the cooking process may render the outside layers overcooked while the inside remains undercooked. If you are cooking a whole chicken breast, consider the butterfly technique and using a meat mallet or a large knife to flatten thickness. This will cut down on cooking time and create evenness in the cooking process of the chicken.

Red pepper flake and shallots may be difficult to pinpoint and isolate in an Italian dish, but when they are missing, it is similar to the foundation being cracked in a structure. Unstable and shaky, the pasta dish cannot stand without the fundamental building blocks of flavor.

If you like pasta to be “al dente”, purposely undercook the pasta by a minute or two in boiling water. When the pasta is added to your sauce, you can cook it to its desired consistency and texture. Please, please, please never drain pasta and then serve after topping it with sauce! The pasta needs to be cooked in the sauce to create a complete pasta dish-it allows the pasta to soak up and stick to the sauce.

IMG_7725

Servings: 4-6
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients
½ package dried penne
½ package bacon or pancetta, chopped
2 cloves garlic
1 diced shallot
2 chicken breasts
1 tsp garlic salt, or to taste
pinch of red pepper flake, to taste
1 tbsp black pepper
1 tsp dried basil
¼ c sherry wine
1 pint heavy whipping cream
1 cup grated Parmigianno Reggiano
1 bunch spinach
2 medium tomatoes, diced
1 bunch basil

Bring a large pot of water to boil. Boil pasta according to package directions (approximately 7-10 minutes).

While pasta is cooking, sauté pancetta in large skillet. Heat skillet on medium high and place pancetta in the pan. When the bacon begins to crisp up showing a nice golden brown color, add onion and garlic. Saute for another 2-3 minutes, then set aside.

Thinly slice chicken breast into ¼ inch thick pieces. Season with garlic salt, red pepper flake, black pepper, dried basil. Set aside for 10 minutes to marinate. When chicken has finished marinating, heat large skillet and drizzle with oil. Sear chicken until both sides are golden brown (approximately 3-5 minutes). Then add pancetta, garlic, and shallot mixture.

Add wine and heavy whipping cream, and Parmiggiano Reggiano into the chicken. Allow to simmer for 10-15 minutes, until the chicken is cooked through and the sauce thickens.

Drain the pasta and add into chicken and cream sauce. Add a splash of pasta water to adjust consistency of the pasta sauce. When the pasta sauce has thickened to desired consistency, add spinach and tomato. Allow to cook for 2-3 minutes.

Turn off the fire and add in fresh basil. Adjust seasoning as needed: add garlic salt, red pepper flake, Parmiggiano Reggiano, and black pepper to taste.

 

Truffle Pan Seared Steak

img_1898

Another truffle recipe from the same truffle that I was gifted months ago. Truffle is a special ingredient in that it does not require any fancy preparation or cooking. With its deep earthy umami flavor, it simply needs shaving/grating, and then gets incorporated into a dish that does not mask its flavor. In my experience, black truffle pairs very well with beef, potatoes, and creamy pasta dishes. It’s also great with a simple bread and butter combo.

The key to this truffle steak recipe is a quality piece of meat. Although it is an admirable feat to transform humble ingredients into a mouthwatering dish, some dishes necessitate high quality ingredients. I oftentimes buy my steak from Ralphs, Trader Joe’s, or Sprouts because they tend to have higher quality meats that are within my price range. I prefer New York Strip or top sirloin because of their high flavor profile and affordability. I avoid rib eye for health reasons because of its high fat content and higher price tag, but that would be an excellent cut for this dish as well. My favorite accompaniments to a well-seared piece of steak? Homemade creamed spinach, creamed corn, and some buttery fluffy mashed potatoes. Those recipes will likely follow in future posts.

img_1846

Cooking and eating bring so much joy and comfort to me. Although I try to avoid extreme emotional eating on most days, some days you just need a full steak dinner to reward yourself for a hard day’s work. I like to make special dinners for my fiancé and me on Fridays, because it marks the end of our workweek. Sharing a special dinner just helps to jumpstart the beginning of a relaxing and fun weekend. Without further ado, I hope you make good use of this truffle steak recipe to celebrate a romantic evening at home with your significant other.

 

img_1855img_1873Cooking notes/tips:

Invest in a cast iron skillet or heavy skillet for optimal searing of steaks and meats. You won’t be sorry!

I almost always sear my steaks/pork chops/chicken breasts, and then finish cooking in the oven.

Always. I mean, always allow your steak to rest 7-10 minutes before serving. This will allow its juices to redistribute prior to cutting, preventing a dry steak.

Recipe
Servings: 6-8
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cooking Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients
1 tsp truffle salt
pepper, to taste
2 tbsp butter
4 cloves garlic
1 sprig rosemary
6 top sirloin steaks

Directions 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Pat steaks dry and season generously with truffle salt, pepper, and any additional salt to taste.

Heat cast iron skillet on high heat. Place a pat of butter and 2 cloves of garlic into the pan. Continue moving garlic around, allowing it to flavor the butter. Then add sprig of rosemary into melted butter and allow this to flavor the butter.

Sear steak in 2-3 batches. Place steaks onto pan and allow to sear for 3-5 minutes, or until golden brown.

Continuously turn sprig of rosemary and garlic cloves to prevent burning. Remove garlic cloves from pan once they are golden brown

Flip steaks and allow the other side to sear 3-5 minutes.

Place garlic cloves and steaks in the oven and allow to roast for 10-20 minutes at 350 degrees, depending on thickness and desired level of doneness. For medium steak, roast for 10-15 minutes.

When steak is at desired level of doneness, take out of oven and allow to rest for 10 minutes.

Slice steak and shave fresh black truffle on the top. Serve immediately with roasted garlic cloves.